Courses

ART102 Art Appreciation [3-0, 3 cr.] 
This introductory course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the visual arts. Based on the analysis of selective works by visual artists, the course focuses on the elements of composition, media, techniques, and the creators’ visual reasoning in selected periods of art history ranging from the Renaissance to Neo-Classism, Romanticism, Modern Art and Contemporary Art. It aims to examine the work of artists in their social context, encouraging students to develop an analytical and comprehensive approach to the visual arts.

ART201 Fundamentals of Design I [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This course is a studio course investigating the basic elements and principles of the visual arts in two dimensional media and form.

ART211 Ceramics I [0-4, 3 cr.] 
This course is an introductory course to the primary techniques of hand-made pottery, its maintenance, and finish, as well as the understanding, preparation, and maintenance, of clay through its various stages, and the relation of design, functional and otherwise, to the medium.

ART212 Ceramics II [0-4, 3 cr.] 
This course is a focus on wheel-made pottery, stressing the relation of good functional design to useful wheel-made objects, by offering basic shapes of such pottery.
Pre-requisite: ART211 Ceramics I

ART221 Drawing I [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This course is a study of the basic drawing techniques in various media with regard to landscape, still life, and the human figure. It explores different modes of expressions including notions of perspective in diverse compositions.

ART222 Drawing II [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This course is a concentrated study of the human figure, emphasizing analysis and the synthesis of visual experience.
Pre-requisite: ART221 Drawing I

ART331 History of Art I [3-0, 3 cr.] 
This course is a survey of the visual art in the ancient Oriental, Classical, and Medieval Periods.

ART332 History of Art II [3-0, 3 cr.] 
This course is a survey of the visual art in the Renaissance, Baroque, and Modern periods.

ART333 Art Education [1-4, 3 cr.] 
This course is a survey of the principles, materials, techniques, and resources for teaching art to children. Emphasis is on the extensive variety of art media suitable for young children, such as clay, paint, collage, and drawing.

ART334 Graphics [0-6, 3 cr.]
This course is a studio course investigating the basic printing processes of intaglio, planography, and relief.
Prerequisite: ART201 Fundamentals of Design I, or ART221 Drawing I

ART335 Islamic Art of the Middle East [3-0, 3 cr.] 
This course is designed to stimulate a deeper understanding of Islamic Art of the Middle East, by unfolding its cultural origins.

ART341 Painting I [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This course is an introduction to painting procedure. The course includes detailed studies from still life, landscape, and the human figure.
Prerequisites: ART221 Drawing I, or the consent of the Instructor

ART342 Painting II [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This course is a studio course that looks into a variety of approaches to space interpretation on a two dimensional plane.
Prerequisite: ART341 Painting I, or the consent of the Instructor

ART351 Sculpture I [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This is a course facilitating the realization of three dimensional forms by modelling, carving, and casting, meaningful subjects.

ART352 Sculpture II [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This is an advanced course that provides for greater proficiency in creation of the three-dimensional form. Special emphasis on the production of free standing, and relief sculpture for specific sites, is covered.
Prerequisite: ART351 Sculpture I, or the consent of the Instructor

ART431 Modern Art [3-0, 3 cr.] 
This course is a comprehensive examination of stylistic developments in visual art from the advent of impressionism to the present.

ART441 Painting III [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This course is a studio course developing in students a greater awareness of the elements of art’s expressive potential in the creation of various moods.
Prerequisite: ART342 Painting II, or the consent of the Instructor

ART499 Senior Study [0-6, 3 cr.] 
This is a senior course providing for independent initiation and execution of art projects, allowing for greater depth and research in the development of a personal idiom.

FAS250 Introduction to Practice and Process [1-3, 3cr.]
This course will give students the opportunity to consolidate creative and practical skills learnt in the foundation and build upon these to be fashion focused. As an introduction to the fashion design development: practice and process, the students will use drawing as a tool for recording and researching to evolve visual thinking and produce design ideas developed from a theme. They will produce a sketchbook with a strong emphasis on primary research and individual response and apply awareness of future fashion trends, relevant market forces and seasons. This studio course covers exercises and demonstrations, lectures, group critiques and self-directed study and location research.
Co-requisite: FAS251 Thematic Workshop

FAS251 Thematic Workshop [0-2, 1cr.]
An invited fashion or textile designer offers this 1 credit workshop. In this workshop students consolidate and build upon working practices learned in the Introduction to Practice and Process course by producing sampling appropriate for an international fashion market. Students are introduced to fabrics for fashion through experimentation in 3D on the stand. Working with an industry specialist, students experience first-­‐hand how fabrications are taken to the next stage of the design process in the production of garments, accessories and concept pieces for a wide range of markets levels. This course is workshop based and independent study is a requirement.  
Co-requisite: FAS250 Introduction to Practice and Process

FAS331 Fashion Design I [1-6, 5cr.]
Fashion Design I introduces fundamental principles for fashion designers working in a global industry. The core aims are to introduce an array of research methods and the importance this has as the foundation of the design process. To understand design development, namely working in series producing concepts that relate to one another and finally, to consider the requirements when designing for a specific market or ideal customer. Drawing methods both illustrative and technical and portfolio presentation skills are also introduced for students to communicate coherent design concepts in this comprehensive introductory course. Developing professional practice is a requirement in this and all future courses. Students learn through lectures, studio exercises, workshops and tutorials.
Pre-requisites: FAS250 Introduction to Practice and Process, FAS251 Thematic Workshop
Co-requisites: FAS341 Construction I, 
 FAS361 Pattern Cutting I

FAS332 Fashion Design II [1-6, 5cr.]
The studio explores designing for jersey and denim garments as a key aspect in producing commercially viable ranges. In a saturated market this course challenges students to uncover original research resources to ensure their designs reflect an emerging design philosophy. This studio introduces students to branding and marketing in placing collections at an appropriate market level as well as the significance of trend researching at a global level. The responsibility of ethical sourcing and production will be explored through an understanding of how the denim market has responded to the various issues in using cotton and applying finishes. Drawing methods and portfolio presentation skills are further explored and refined during this studio. Students learn through lectures, studio exercises, workshops and tutorials. 
Pre-requisites: FAS331 Fashion Design I,  FAS341 Construction I, FAS361 Pattern Cutting I
Co-requisites: FAS342 Construction II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II

FAS341 Construction I [2-2, 3 cr.]
This workshop introduces the sewing lab and a variety of industrial equipment and machinery. The ability to use machinery with confidence and accuracy is essential to success for any new fashion designer; to understand appropriate finishing and construction techniques allows design ideas to be presented to a professional standard. During the first half of the semester students are given an induction and shown how to safely use the machinery in the production of samples. Workshop exercises cover a wide variety of sampling from the basic seams, zip insertions, the considerations of working with fabrics of different weights and properties through to the production of garment prototypes that are based on creative practice in Fashion Design I and Pattern Cutting I. Health and safety procedures and the ability to use machinery with care are essential requirements of this workshop. Students learn through demonstrations, practical workshop exercises and individual guidance. 
Pre-requisites: FAS250 Introduction to Practice and Process, FAS251 Thematic Workshop
Co-requisites: FAS331 Fashion Design I, FAS361 Pattern Cutting I

FAS342 Construction II [1-3, 3cr.]
This intermediate workshop introduces the necessary skills of working with denim and stretch fabrics and the specialist machinery in the construction of such garments. Students produce samples appropriate for denim and jersey with key elements including signature pocket styles, trouser openings, collars and topstitch. Crucial to success is the ability to sew with accuracy and care when handling a diverse range of fabrics. Sampling forms an important reference archive that builds on from techniques learnt in Construction I. During the second half of the semester students produce an outfit using patterns developed from Pattern Cutting II. This workshop further introduces industry production processes including lay planning and costings and technical specification sheets. Students learn through demonstrations, practical workshop exercises and individual guidance.
Pre-requisites: FAS331 Fashion Design I, FAS341 Construction I, FAS361 Pattern Cutting I
Co-requisites: FAS332 Fashion Design II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II

FAS361 Pattern Cutting I [2-2, 4 cr.]
This studio introduces the core principles of pattern cutting at a professional industry level and its role in the design process. The requirements of pattern making include accuracy, using basic blocks and the correct way to annotate patterns as the starting point of this course. Demonstrations take the student through a series of exercises aimed at developing understanding of how pattern manipulation impacts on the silhouette and detail of a garment. The second half of the semester is spent developing individual design concepts from Fashion Design I and gives the opportunity to put into practice principles learned, including crucially how garments fit the human body. Through this process students will gain an appreciation of how interpretation from 2D ideas can achieve varied outcomes. Students learn through demonstrations, practical exercises and tutorials.
Pre-requisites: FAS250 Introduction to Practice and Process, FAS251 Thematic Workshop
Co-requisites: FAS331 Fashion Design I, FAS341 Construction I

FAS362 Pattern Cutting II [2-2, 4cr.]
Pattern cutting techniques taught in this intermediate studio elaborate on those in Pattern Cutting I by nurturing an ambitious approach to proportion, silhouette, detailing and volume for denim, jersey and related fabrics. During the first half of the semester students undertake a variety of cutting exercises aimed at understanding the core skills required for working with these fabrics- to understand the specific properties and the impact this has on the pattern cutting process. Classic details in denim will be explored as well as techniques appropriate for working with jersey fabrics. The second half of the semester is devoted to producing patterns that realize concepts from Design II and further develop an understanding of how garments fit the body. Students learn through demonstrations, practical exercises and tutorials. 
Pre-requisites: FAS331 Fashion Design I, FAS341 Construction I, FAS361 Pattern Cutting I
Co-requisites: FAS332 Fashion Design II, FAS342 Construction II

FAS371 Fashion History and Theory [2-0, 3cr.]
This course is a survey of the development of fashion and accessory design through different periods, with a particular emphasis on the modern period, beginning with industrialization. Social, cultural, economic and industrial factors are discussed along with major art movements that contributed to the development of fashion, and as precursors of contemporary fashion trends. This course further explores in detail the contemporary developments in fashion design around the world with a focus on major names and brands. Students learn through lectures and seminars. 

FAS381 Fashion Illustration [1-3, 3cr.]
Illustration is not merely about traditional academic drawing, but about expressing the mood of a collection or the aesthetics of a designer. This studio introduces the use of experimental drawing styles, mark making and digital design skills for communicating the human figure. Students are encouraged to develop their own personal style that may be abstract, unorthodox or challenging. This studio is taught through lectures, demonstrations, practical exercises and tutorials in the production of a conceptual portfolio.
Pre-requisites: FND236 Design Studio II, FND251 Digital Media, FND281 Design Culture

FAS382 Contour Design [2-2, 3cr.]
This studio introduces the specialist area of swimwear and related garments and builds on Pattern Cutting II and construction II where students were introduced to stretch jersey. Technical skills and considerations for working with high stretch fabrics that support the body are explored, whilst historical context forms part of the research students undertake, along with a review of the current market in developing concept, designs and range. This is especially of interest for designers who wish to expand their knowledge of this growing market within the region. Students learn through demonstrations, practical exercises and tutorials in the development of directional garments.
Pre-requisites: FAS342 Construction II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II

FAS383 Styling [1-3, 3cr.]
The status of the stylist has shifted from a supportive role in fashion shoots to taking the helm of fashion publications and houses. This studio introduces students to the considerations required to make a successful stylist. This includes: the agenda of a shoot, whether concept of commercially driven, coordinating a hair and make-up team, set design, the model and photographer. An overview of magazines both online and print will be reviewed as a starting point to analyze types of content and features. Students learn through lectures, seminars, independent research and practical demonstrations.
Pre-requisites: FND236 Design Studio II, FND251 Digital Media, FND281 Design Culture

FAS421 Fashion Internship [0-0, 3cr.]
The fashion internship is an invaluable introduction to understanding how a business functions. As an intern you will have the opportunity to learn first-hand how the design process is part of a larger picture working to strict deadlines and commercial realities. Students have the opportunity to work in Lebanon or further afield after being matched with an appropriate company or design house where possible. The expectation is for students to become immersed in the working practices of the company for up to two semesters and to use this knowledge during the final year in the development of a fashion collection. The Fashion Internship is directly related to Fashion Entrepreneurship I, II and III.
Pre-requisite: FAS431 Fashion Design III

FAS431 Fashion Design III [1-6, 5cr.]
This intermediate studio brings together skills from previous courses and allows students to define their own emerging style. Outerwear is often the focus of a collection as it allows designers to both display conceptual innovation and advancement in construction and fabrication. These pieces can be an important marketing tool and used to display the concepts of the collection through advertising campaigns and editorial shoots. Designing outerwear also introduces students to an understanding of how climate can impact on the design and merchandising of a collection or range. Students learn through lectures, studio exercises, workshops and tutorials.
Pre-requisites: FAS332 Fashion Design II, FAS342 Construction II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II
Co-requisites: FAS441 Construction III, FAS461 Pattern Cutting III

FAS441 Construction III [2-2, 3cr.]
This intermediate workshop teaches students the skills and planning necessary for producing tailored garments. During the first half of the semester students work with a standard jacket pattern in the production of a jacket toile. This includes use of interlinings, developing different pocket types through to shoulder pads, buttonholes and correct methods for pressing and finishing. These skills consolidate previous Construction workshops and underpin the standards required for the final major project. The second half to the semester is spent realizing garments from Design III and Pattern Cutting III. Students learn through demonstrations, practical workshop exercises and individual tutorials. 
Pre-requisites: FAS332 Fashion Design II, FAS342 Construction II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II
Co-requisites: FAS431Fashion Design III, FAS461 Pattern Cutting III

FAS461 Pattern Cutting III [2-2, 4cr.]
This intermediate studio introduces the core principles and practices required in the cutting and production of soft tailoring and outerwear. This course takes the student through the essential stages required in the production of structured and unstructured outerwear garments paying particular attention to the impact of fabric choices on the cutting process. During the first half of the semester students learn about the importance of balance and fit as well as developing skills centered on understanding collars, two-piece sleeves and linings. The second half of the studio is spent realizing patterns for the production of garments selected from Design III, of which one piece will be outerwear. Students learn through demonstrations, practical exercises and tutorials.
Pre-requisites: FAS332 Fashion Design II, FAS342 Construction II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II
Co-requisites: FAS431 Fashion Design III, FAS441 Construction III

FAS481 Specialist Cutting Techniques [2-2, 3cr.]
This intermediate studio further develops specialist techniques by studying the work of the great couturiers and designers from the 20th century. This is an ideal opportunity for those interested in occasion wear to understand the precision required to produce refined garments. During this course students follow a number of demonstrations on specialist techniques adding to an expanding creative repertoire. During the latter half of the semester, students embark on the production of industry accurate patterns and finished toiles. Students learn through demonstrations, practical exercises and tutorials.
Pre-requisites: FAS342 Construction II, FAS362 Pattern Cutting II

FAS482 Accessory Design [1-3, 3cr.]
This intermediate studio explores and builds on the rich heritage of leather production and craftsmanship already available within Lebanon and nurtures individual direction through research, concept and design. Submissions expand from original concept through to patternmaking and fabrication of the finished accessory prototypes. Students work with an industry specialist and where appropriate at an atelier whilst learning through demonstrations, practical workshop exercises and individual tutorials.
Pre-requisite: FAS332 Fashion Design II

FAS483 Designer Fabrics [1-3, 3cr.]
This intermediate studio develops processes essential in the production of unique fabrications for fashion and accessory design. In this course students explore themes that challenge and re-define boundaries within their practice by producing mixed process sampling. The outcome of this studio sees in-depth research, development of concept through to industry standard sampling and an understanding of the intended market level. As part of this course students are expected to use digital printing processes as well as liaising with artisans and specialist suppliers. Students learn through demonstrations, practical workshop exercises and individual tutorials.
Pre-requisite: FAS332 Fashion Design II

FAS521 Fashion Entrepreneurship I [2-0, 2cr.]
The many aspects of successfully running a fashion business are broken down into key areas where students discover that design talent is just a small part of running a successful business. For many graduates, setting up their own business is a dream and this course enables the preparation for that to happen by equipping students with essential entrepreneurial skills. From legal structures through to the day to day running of a business, students learn the organizational skills necessary for success. Students learn through lectures, seminars and group tutorials.
Pre-requisite: FAS421 Fashion Internship 

FAS522 Fashion Entrepreneurship II [2-0, 2cr.]
Following on from Fashion Entrepreneurship I, this intensive course takes students through the steps necessary to plan and write a viable business proposal. By working through each stage of the plan, students hone their professional organizational and writing skills through learning the processes required in establishing a business. These skills prove invaluable for anyone working as a freelance designer through to those wishing to establish a business upon graduation or in the future. Students are taught through lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Pre-requisite: FAS521 Fashion Entrepreneurship I
Co-requisites: FAS523 Fashion Entrepreneurship III, 
FAS532 Fashion Collection II

FAS523 Fashion Entrepreneurship III [0-0, 1 cr.]
Fashion Entrepreneurship III is an industry based workshop and completes this advanced series by linking students with artisans and ateliers in the production of final collection pieces and beyond. This platform is an invaluable resource in knowing what is available and how to access the people who can manufacture accessories, garments and shoes for individual pieces or larger runs. Students learn through lectures, tutorials and industry visits.
Co-requisites: FAS522 Fashion Entrepreneurship II, FAS532 Fashion Collection II

FAS531 Fashion Collection I [1-6, 5cr.]
Fashion Collection I is an advanced studio that sees students research and develop a collection that wholly centers on individual design philosophy. During this intensive semester students negotiate a directional theme from which a wide range of creative research and design methods are employed in generating ideas that are highly creative and commercially viable. With a deeper understanding of fabric manipulation, pattern cutting and construction, students are able to visualize how garments will look when realized and thus produce work that demonstrates refinement and finesse. It is in this studio that the basis of the collection is set and all work including portfolio, presentation boards and marketing are subject to further critical analysis and change in Fashion Collection II. Students learn through intensive individual tutorials and jury presentations.
Pre-requisites: FAS421 Fashion Internship, FAS431 Fashion Design III
Co-requisites: FAS541 Construction IV, FAS561 Pattern Cutting IV

FAS532 Fashion Collection II [1-6, 5cr.]
This advanced course directly relates to Fashion Collection I in the completion of a portfolio and fashion collection. This multi-disciplinary studio incorporates, design, pattern cutting, construction and accessory design whilst ensuring that the proposed collection retains the core values as set out during Fashion Collection I. Work undertaken is expected to further define individual students’ approach to fashion whilst adapting to new working methods in the pursuit of a collection that remains fresh to the eye. Focus and organizational skills are central to this intensive course in coordinating and producing a collection that typifies how the student wishes to be seen in a global fashion economy. At the completion of the course, students present their fully styled final collection, resolved portfolio with promotional strategy to a jury of academics and industry professionals in a formal setting. Students learn through intensive individual tutorials.
Pre-requisite: FAS531 Fashion Collection I
Co-requisites: FAS522 Fashion Entrepreneurship II, FAS523 Fashion Entrepreneurship III 

FAS541 Construction IV [1-3, 3cr.]
This final advanced Construction workshop sees students explore and resolve manufacturing issues for their final collection by testing techniques and processes learned throughout the program. It is here that students have the opportunity to experiment and push the boundaries of accepted norms of how garments may be perceived. The production of a final collection requires skill, planning and finesse at every stage to ensure professional standards remain paramount with self-directed study and planning being central to this. This workshop sees students produce a series of garment prototypes for the express purpose of understanding how a collection might function when realized in the actual fabrics. Students learn through individual technical guidance.
Pre-requisite: FAS441 Construction III
Co-requisites: FAS531 Fashion Collection I, FAS561 Pattern Cutting IV

FAS551 Fashion Thematic Workshop [0-0, 1cr.]
This is an advanced level workshop that provides students with specialized skills and techniques in the production of their portfolio, garments or brand. The theme of this workshop will vary and is determined by fashion mainstream trends and market demands. 

FAS561 Pattern Cutting IV [2-2, 4cr.]
During this final advanced Pattern Cutting course, students have the opportunity to test their techniques and skills in the production of key silhouettes for their final collection. This is the last time students have access to a pattern cutter and it is expected they will push the boundaries of this discipline in the pursuit of excellence. At this point there are no longer demonstrations and exercises, but rather students are expected to work on their self-directed study program. The ability to produce industry accurate patterns that demonstrate finesse is essential to success as are the organizational skills required for producing an array of complex patterns for a collection. Students learn through individual tutorials.
Pre-requisite: FAS461 Pattern Cutting III
Co-requisites: FAS431 Fashion Design III, FAS541 Construction IV 

FND201 Photography for Foundation [2-3, 3cr.]
This course is an introduction to digital photography, presenting the basic aesthetic and theoretical principles of photography, including composition, exposure and lighting basics. Discussions will be complemented by applied projects that explore different photography techniques based on a variety of themes. This course also introduces a range of practical techniques to photograph art and design works as well as process digital images. Students are required to obtain their own digital camera for this course. 
Note: This course is restricted to SArD majors

GRA212 Introduction to Typography [2-2, 3 cr.]
This course introduces students to the principles of typography. Through presentations, demonstrations and projects students will be introduced to all aspects of typography. They will be exposed to the historical influences on type, both aesthetically and technologically. They will develop a series of exercises including: the anatomy of letterforms, the basics of type design, and typographic studies in expression, composition and communication. The course examines both Latin and Arabic type, and the typographic translation from one to the other.
Pre-requisites: FND236 Design Studio II, FND251 Digital Media, FND281 Design Culture

GRA301 Intermediate Computer Graphics [2-2, 3 cr.]  
This intermediate level computer graphics lab course teaches applications that are fundamental to the field of graphic design. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency and creativity through the manipulation of vector graphics, raster graphics, color, text, layout, grid and die-cuts through an advanced understanding of Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign. The division of the course is based on demonstrations, presentations, exercises, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: FND236 Design Studio II, FND251 Digital Media, FND281 Design culture

GRA302 Advanced Computer Graphics [2-2, 3 cr.]
This advanced level computer graphics lab course teaches various animation techniques and software. Animation development is explored through the manipulation and integration of image, graphics, sound, and typography in motion. The division of the course is based on demonstrations, presentations, projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisite: FND251 Digital Media

GRA306 Sketching for Animation [1-2, 2 cr.] 
Examination of concepts and techniques for animation with emphasis on developing the drawing and sketching skill sets particular to the practice of animation both 2D and 3D. It is designed to build a solid foundation in drawing the human figure in motion and to develop a strong draftsmanship of traditional drawing skills. These skills and knowledge will be necessary and beneficial in the creation of animation projects in the advance animation courses.

GRA307 Design for Animation [1-2, 2 cr.] 
This class focuses on the process of shot design. Building on a solid foundation of research, this class teaches students how to work within a brief to create designs for characters, props, and locations. Students gain first-hand experience of how to visualize, communicate an idea, and create design documents.

GRA308 Motion Graphics [1-2, 2 cr.] 
This course is designed to teach students how to successfully use After Effects and Cinema 4D. Motion Graphic Design introduces students to the principles and elements of motion design through studio practices at beginning and advanced levels. Both the beginner and seasoned user can benefit from the course, starting with the basics of the program, continuing on to more advanced features including animation and working in 3D.

GRA309 Visual Storytelling [0-2, 1 cr.] 
Storyboarding is the art of working out story problems and determining which camera angles give the most impact to a scene. It is a visual format of the story idea and serves as a “blueprint” throughout the animation and/or film process. Students express their ideas visually using proper film terminology, labeling, and presentation. They study basic storytelling principles, and learn to illustrate camera angles through drawing, composition, and perspective in order to create a mood in a scene or emotion in a character. Students use storyboards as a tool to further develop an idea and as a comprehensive communication device in teamwork.

GRA310 Character Design [0-2, 1 cr.] 
In this course, students discover and practice the fundamental character design principles, professional techniques, procedures, and terms used in the creation of characters and model sheets. Students study the various disciplines of character design, including the importance of turnarounds and silhouette, the use of different proportions to visualize archetypes, poses that define action and personality, character design analysis, developing complementary and contrasting characters, and exploring different character design styles.

GRA312 Printing Variables [3-0, 3 cr.] 
Various printing processes, principles and techniques are integral to print media studies in graphic design. This course is taught through lectures, assignments, and fieldtrips to print industries. Emphasis is place upon the vocabulary of the print industry and hands-on experience through the study of printing specification, quotations and pricing, file preparation and professional printing.
Pre-requisite: GRA352 Graphic Design II

GRA324 Intermediate Typography [2 cr.] 
This is an intermediate studio course that introduces students to the history and current practice of type in various areas of communication design. Projects in this class range from typography applications in simple publication to more advanced information graphics and screen-based interactive media projects. It will address the grid and modular type systems in editorial and bi-lingual typography. Students will learn to manipulate typography as a powerful communicative tool. This class will teach students an understanding of the properties of typefaces and their use in different contexts. The class will investigate the history of type and printing, principles of spacing, the use of typographic contrast in composition, legibility, and hierarchy.
Pre-requisite: GRA212 Introduction to Typography
Co-requisite: GRA301 Intermediate Computer Graphics

GRA325 Thematic Workshop I [1 cr.] 
This is an intermediate level workshop that provides the students with specialized skills and techniques in the production of their projects. The theme if this workshop will vary and will be set depending on the visual communication mainstream trends and the market demands.

GRA331 Design Management [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This course aims to develop strategic management skills with a focus on the role of design in the creation and management of strategic and sustainable business practices. Classes are structured to replicate real- world industry scenarios providing a hands-on experience in designing, managing, and improving design- intensive and creative firms. The course integrates research with design-centered studio work. Perspectives on business, operations, sustainability, management, leadership, entrepreneurship, design innovation, and design research are explored. Students develop their capacity to inspire and lead creative teams.

GRA341 Art of Calligraphy [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This elective studio course teaches the art of beautiful handwriting. Simultaneously, the study, research and history of calligraphy as well as its development into a contemporary art form is explored. Importance is placed on the understanding of proportions to enhance legibility combined with the ability to communicate a feeling. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.

GRA342 Art of Illustration [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This studio course teaches drawing skills through the use of diverse media and assigned research on the history of illustration. Emphasis is placed on the development of personal style in illustration through research, projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisite: ART222 Drawing II

GRA345 Silkscreen and Binding [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This elective studio course introduces the students to silkscreen, printmaking and book binding methods. Through hand-drawn separations, photographic film, digital separations and Xeroxed images, a range of silkscreen techniques are implemented. Various book binding techniques including Japanese binding; accordion folds and signature binding are explored. This course is taught through project development, demonstrations, studio sessions, discussions and critiques.

GRA351 Graphic Design I [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This studio course explores the principles, problem solving methodology and techniques of graphic design. It investigates visual identity systems applied to printed materials that integrate typography, image, graphics, color and composition for logo and promotional materials design. Emphasis placed on the process of graphic design, research, concept development and the production of bilingual designs. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: GRA301 Intermediate Computer Graphics, GRA324 Intermediate Typography, GRA431 History of Graphic Design

GRA352 Graphic Design II [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This studio course is an in-depth exploration of publication and editorial concept design. Emphasis is placed on grid system development, composition and the integration of color, illustration, photography, and typography for bilingual publications. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: GRA301 Intermediate Computer Graphics, GRA351 Graphic Design I

GRA361 Designing for Social Change [2-2, 3 cr.] 
In this studio course students actively engage in the design of a community-based project. The aim of this course is to facilitate collaborations between student designers and the community. Emphasis is placed upon design thinking and participatory design as a means to engage audiences within design towards positive social change. In this class students work as a group of active citizen designers that guide and shape critical aspects of their community. The course addresses the ethical implications, role of visual communication and cultural integrity of design in society. This course is taught through discussions, projects, workshops and on-site research.

GRA391 Graphic Design International Studio [1-4, 3 cr.] 
This course involves a study abroad experience in which student explore contemporary graphic design on an international level. The course is supported by a preparatory series of discussions on the subject of study. Observation, documentation, analysis and design are each integral to the course. The outcome of this learning experience is first compiled into a sketchbook and then designed as and interactive interface or a book project. The course is taught primarily through studio, gallery and exhibition tours.

GRA408 Digital Painting [2-4, 4 cr.] 
Students learn how to create story-driven worlds through the interplay of characters, objects, and their environments. They enhance their color theory, design, and research-based skills through expressing the mood or theme of a script. This course culminates in the development of compelling environment paintings in service to story. The majority of class time is structured around digital painting and sketchbook studies.

GRA409 2D Animation [2-2, 3 cr.] 
Animators breathe life into characters and make them come alive on screen. Regardless of the medium used, the animation principles required to make characters believable are the same. With a focus on traditional, hand-drawn character animation, students learn key industry terminology and practice production procedures including how keys, breakdowns, and in-betweens, all combine to make fluid action. In interactive lectures and hands-on exercises, instructors stress basic principles as students explore squash and stretch, anticipation and settle, the wave principle, and overlapping action. Students also have the opportunity to develop skills in clean-up, the technique of producing a polished drawing from a rough animation.

GRA410 Advanced 2D Animation [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This course is designed to allow classically trained animators to gain a fundamental and functional understanding of two of the major 2D digital animation software: Flash and Toon Boom. Students work in a simulated production environment to create a short animated film in Flash. Special attention is given to the pipeline, specifically as used in studio production rather than for web application. Collaboration between students is encouraged. Following their short films, students learn more about the Toon Boom interface through an exercise in which they create and animate a character.

GRA411 Advanced Typography [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This advance level studio course explores the intricacies of typography. Typeface development and typographic experimentation, typography as an expressive visual form and as a functional vehicle of communication is taught.
Emphasis is placed on bilingual typography the structural differences between Arabic and Latin typography. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: GRA324 Intermediate Typography, GRA351 Graphic Design I

GRA431 History of Graphic Design [3-0, 3 cr.] 
This course serves as a comprehensive survey of the history of graphic design from prehistoric visual communications to the proliferation of digital technology and contemporary design. This course teaches the evolution of graphic design through the impact of technological advancements, critical events and innovations by historical figures in the field of graphic design. Emphasis is placed on the analysis linking historical events to current graphic design debates. The course is taught through presentations, research paper, writing, readings and discussions.
Pre-requisite: ENG102 English II

GRA432 Visual Perception [2-2, 3 cr.] 
How designers decode visual information and audiences encode them is fundamental to the discipline of graphic design. This course approaches the study of visual culture and its theoretical framework. It investigates the production, form and reception of images as well as introduces theoretical strategies to understand how meaning is produced by and through images within their historical context. This course is taught through presentations, discussions, projects and critiques.
Pre-requisite: ENG102 English II

GRA451 Graphic Design III [2-2, 3 cr.] 
The generation of three-dimensional package design solutions is an integral component within print media. This course examines the multi-faceted problem solving methodology of three-dimensional graphic design. Importance is placed on the development of innovative, economical, sustainable, functional and aesthetic package design. This course is taught through exercises, demonstrations, projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: GRA352 Graphic Design II, GRA411 Advanced Typography
Co-requisite: GRA462 Graphic Design Seminar

GRA455 Advertising Design [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This advanced level studio course investigates the relationship between creativity and sales. Emphasis is placed on new directions of creative, intelligent, ethical and persuasive skills for the layout of advertisement and copywrite. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: ENG 102 English II

GRA462 Graphic Design Seminar [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This course serves as an in-depth seminar on subjects of current interest in graphic design and new media. The integration of theories from related disciplines in recent graphic design debates are introduced and critical thinking is encouraged. Emphasis is place on methodological research and the role of the graphic designer. This course is taught through presentations, exercises, research paper, writing, readings and discussions.
Pre-requisites: ENG102 English II, GRA352 Graphic Design II, GRA431 History of Graphic Design, GRA432 Visual Perception

GRA465 Thematic Workshop II [1 cr.]
This is an advanced level workshop that provides the students with specialized skills and techniques in the production of their final projects. The theme of this workshop will vary and will be set depending on the visual communication mainstream trends and the market demands.
Pre-requisite: GRA325 Thematic Workshop I

GRA482 Motion Design [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This advanced level studio course explores the conceptualization, methodological procedures and applications of design in motion. Emphasis is placed on time-based media combining typography, image, sound and video. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: GRA302 Advanced Computer Graphics, GRA484 Web Design
Co-requisite: GRA462 Graphic Design Semina
r

GRA484 Web Design [2-2, 3 cr.] 
Web design is integral to digital media studies in graphic design. This course introduces web design development and serves as an extensive exploration of website navigation and interactivity. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisite: GRA302 Advanced Computer Graphics

GRA486 Advanced Interactive Design [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This advanced interactive computer graphics lab course teaches the concepts and techniques of interactive media design. Multimedia, navigation systems and information design are introduced. Emphasis is placed upon advanced Flash scripting, advanced interactive web design, interactive media and video game development. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisites: GRA302 Advanced Computer Graphics, GRA484 Web Design

GRA487 3D Animation Techniques [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This advance level animation course explores various animation techniques of three-dimensional modeling and rendering. Emphasis is placed on virtual design environments, imaging for animation and character development. This course is taught through projects, discussions and critiques.
Pre-requisite: GRA302 Advanced Computer Graphics

GRA488 Graphic Design Portfolio [1 cr.] 
This portfolio course provides students with the guidance and advising needed to develop their individual graphic design portfolio, CV, cover letter, references sheet and business card. Emphasis is placed on the development of a cohesive, well-presented printed and digital portfolio as a personal marketing tool. This course is taught through critiques, discussions and lectures.
Pre-requisite: ENG 102 English II

GRA490 Graphic Design Internship [1 cr.] 
This internship course introduces the students to the professional world of graphic design. The students have to choose a printing press and a design firm, a web design firm or an advertising agency to complete the required hours.
Pre-requisite: GRA352 Graphic Design II

GRA499 Senior Project [1-4, 3 cr.]
In this senior course level students develop their final year project based upon a previously approved topic proposed in GRA462 Seminar course.
Emphasis is placed on students’ ability to translate their cumulative knowledge into effective visual communication developed by a team working in digital and print media. This course is taught through a multi-faceted in-depth design project, critique sessions, a series of juries and culminates in an end-of-year exhibition.
Pre-requisites: GRA 212 Introduction to Typography, GRA411 Advanced Typography, GRA432 Visual Perception, GRA451 Graphic Design III, GRA455 Advertising Design, GRA462 Graphic Design Seminar, GRA482 Motion Design, GRA484 Web Design, GRA486 Advanced Interactive Design

GRA508 3D Modeling [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This course covers the fundamental tools and techniques of character and hard body modeling within Zbrush and Maya. Students learn the importance of matching reference, and how to leverage reference to convey story ideas and contexts. Students examine the process of creating various characters and learn the importance of line flow for deformation and shape. Students study modeling tools, including lattice deformation, enveloping objects, character rigs, point pulling, and expressions. These tools are applied to a series of modeling exercises and assignments to prepare students for the industry production.

GRA509 3D Animation [2-4, 4 cr.] 
This course is divided into 2 part. Part 01 covers the basic principles of animation, and provides students with the basic understanding of timing. Students learn the fundamentals of weight and its direct relation to timing. They also learn to animate basic bouncing, wave motion, and a simple jump. Part 02 students go through all of the steps involved in creating an animated sequence for a short film. Students work in groups to find a 10- to 15-second piece of dialogue to use for a short animated piece. Students go through thumbnailing the shots, blocking, posing, splining, and then polishing the shots.

GRA510 Postproduction [2-2, 3 cr.] 
This course expands on the principles and techniques of illumination using Maya and vray, with an emphasis on using light to create mood. Students gain an understanding of how to simulate indirect illumination, as well as how to separate a render into different layers, to be composited back together in Nuke or After Effects. Students are exposed to different lighting scenarios and light, render and composite a complex animated shot.

PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course is intended to give a general introduction to digital photography, including theoretical lectures and practical applications on the basic principles of photography. The course will include hands-on exercises with a digital camera, and will cover the work of great photographers to illustrate the fundamentals of photocomposition. The course will address four main areas in photography:  technical make-up of a camera, composition, lighting, and introduction to photo editing software.  Students who sign up for this class should have their own digital camera. 
Note: This course is restricted to non-SArD majors

PHO231 History & Theory of Photography [3-0, 3 cr.]
This course will survey the history of photography from its beginning to the present, covering major theoretical movements, including realism, modernism, surrealism, structuralism, postmodernism, and post structuralism. The survey will also study the development of digital photography and its potential theoretical impact.
Pre-requisite: ENG201 English II

PHO301 Studio Photography [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course examines the use of photography in the studio as an application of the medium to visual analysis and presentation. The digital medium format camera is introduced along with the DSLR & workflow software, including scanning, image manipulation, and output. The course is a combination of lectures, demonstrations, supervised lab work and critiques.
Pre-requisite: FND201 Photography for Foundation or PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography

PHO311 Digital Imaging Technologies [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course explores the basic physics of light, color, digital cameras and their components. Emphasis is placed on the manipulation and creation of digital images through various software. Digital images, and their characteristics are addressed as the course examines how to work with digital pictures files in print and electronic forms.
Pre-requisite: FND201 Photography for Foundation or PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography

PHO330 Black & White Analog Photography [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course examines how to see photographically by exploring the basic tools, techniques and aesthetics of 35mm black-and-white analog photography, with special emphasis on the creative use of camera controls, film exposure, development and print with proper use of chemicals. Students are exposed to different darkroom manipulations, experimental methods and techniques aiming at producing a portfolio of photographic artworks. The course is a combination of lectures, demonstrations, supervised lab work and critiques.
Pre-requisite: FND201 Photography for Foundation or PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography

PHO341 Architectural Photography [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course will explore the principals of architectural photography as a language of design through lectures, demonstrations, and critical discussions. Students will engage in ongoing photographic study under a framework of conceptual themes. Specific photographic problems drawn from the ongoing process will be examined in detail; the application of standard compositional forms, graphic styling, use of natural and artificial light, technical issues relative to image acquisition, rendering and presentation.
Pre-requisite: FND201 Photography for Foundation or PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography

PHO342 Landscape Photography [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course explores the unique aesthetic and technical challenges of photographing spatial settings for personal expression and historical documentation. Students would examine the expressive photography of ruins, cityscapes and landscapes. Focus would include perspective compositions, and lighting arrangements.
Pre-requisite: FND201 Photography for Foundation or PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography

PHO344 Fashion Photography [2-3, 3 cr.]
This course is a hands-on study of fashion photography. Emphasis is placed on the use of photographic equipment and lighting techniques specific to the creation of professional photographs suitable for publication in fashion magazines and advertisements. Students assemble a photographic team, create promotional material, and prepare a portfolio for use in the market.
Pre-requisite: FND201 Photography for Foundation or PHO213 Introduction to Digital Photography

VIS711 Storyboarding [2-2, 3 cr.]
This studio course explores the first step in visual storytelling to facilitate the passage from verbal text to visual communication. Students will learn techniques in structuring ideas to communicate stories. This course will help students address various aspects in visual narration such as design, pacing, style and balance in word/image relationships. This course will be taught through a series of projects and critiques that include storyboarding or visually organizing a story for a variety of contexts.

VIS721 Narrative Writing [2-2, 3 cr.]
This course explores various writing assignments and close readings of classic literature, essays, graphic novels, and plays. It focuses on dialogue and scriptwriting. Emphasis is placed on students as authors of visual narratives. The course involves determining the characters, preparing the plot, setting the location, time frame and formatting a script. This course will be taught through lectures, discussions, research and writing.

VIS722 Drawing Strategies for Visual Narrative [2-2, 3 cr.]
This course focuses on building a solid foundation in advanced drawing skills through observation. It explores the formal underpinnings of visual narratives and an overview of tools and techniques. Weekly assignments will challenge students to create clear and compelling visual narratives.
Pre-requisite: VIS731 History of Visual Storytelling

VIS731 History of Visual Storytelling [3-0, 3 cr.]
This course is a survey of the history of visual narrative. It reviews the diverse media that visual narration encompasses. Approaches to telling a story with words and images will be explored in relation to both local and international contexts. The evolution of visual narrative in a range of context will be examined and analyzed. The material for this course will be covered through lectures, discussions, research and screenings.

VIS741 Character Development [2-2, 3 cr.]
This course explores the creation of characters within visual narrative contexts. Focus is placed on establishing character personalities conceptually and visually. Various artistic and illustrative styles are addressed. Anatomy, proportion, perspective, construction and appeal are emphasized. This course will be taught through a series of projects and critiques that include character development and contextualization.
Pre-requisite: VIS711 Storyboarding

VIS742 Advanced Illustration Techniques [2-2, 3 cr.]
Centered on the individual student’s unique talent, this course is designed to develop and solidify personal style, strong concepts and clear execution of ideas. How to approach an illustration job with an understanding of the type of work a student wants to create will be explored. Assignments will be done using a variety of mediums including gouache, colored pencil, pen-and-ink and watercolor. Students are encouraged to work traditionally yet digital methods may be combined.
Pre-requisite: VIS711 Storyboarding

VIS743 Advanced Digital Illustration Techniques [2-2, 3 cr.]
This advanced digital studio course focuses on creating a series of related illustrations. By creating a character and repeating colors and other visual elements through a series of scenes in addition to advanced techniques in creating 3D objects, lighting effects and placing them in perspective on a plane. The students will develop proficiency in drawing or tracing using illustration software.

VIS751 Professional Practices [2-2, 3 cr.]
Students are introduced to career paths available to illustrators, comic artists and visual narrators as they prepare to enter the professional arena. By assembling a portfolio and creating promotional materials they learn how to market themselves as illustrators. Students learn the vernacular of the publishing industry and are instructed on their creative rights.

VIS752 Selling Your Story [2-2, 3 cr.]
The proliferation and advancements in technology and mobile media have redefined how narrative art is created. The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of how they can make their work visible on various social media networks and other platforms. The evolution of storytelling from analog to digitized new media and the future of storytelling will be reviewed.

VIS761 Letters and Image [2-2, 3 cr.]
This is an advanced course that focuses on the history, form, and use of word and image in visual narratives. Through a variety of projects, students explore relationships between ideas, language, form, and communication. This courses addresses possibilities in hand lettering and typography within visual narration. The students will amplify, through letters the stories they aim to tell visually. Students will be encouraged to develop new uses and functions for word and image based storytelling that go beyond current models of publishing.

VIS771 Children’s Book Illustration [2-2, 3 cr.]
This is an advanced course in illustration for children’s books from concept to character development, drawing to design, and media application to finished execution. Students in this course develop drawing and design skills in order to interpret and communicate words and ideas through imagery for children. Characterization, pacing, text interpretation and format are all emphasized in assignments that include illustrating stories for children. In the process, students work with a wide range of media, from watercolor, acrylic and gouache to collage and mixed media.

VIS781 Advanced Printing Techniques [2-2, 3 cr.]
This course integrated new media and traditional media printing techniques for illustrated narratives. This is a highly explorative course: from traditional media in printmaking, current practices to pushing the boundaries of printed media. This course provides a creative opportunity to use a variety of print techniques towards the creation of visual narratives.

VIS791 Japanese Animation [2-2, 3 cr.]
This course is a study in Japanese animation (anime) and comics (manga). Students in this course are introduced to the history, development and cultural significance of Japanese animation and comics. This course examines various examples and then leads into explorations in drawing, storytelling and motion as a reflection of as students gain hands on expressive techniques to draw and animate within various genres of Japanese anime and manga.

VIS795 Field Trip and Visitors [1-4, 3 cr.]
This course is a weekly seminar where guest artists, authors and illustrators are invited to talk about a wide array of tools and techniques and their own approach to their work. This class also includes field trips to local and international locations that support Illustration, comic art and visual narrative initiatives such as visiting artists, studios, publishers, print shops, and museums.

VIS799 Thesis Project [3-3, 6 cr.]
In this course students formulate a yearlong project that builds upon the skills acquired in their first year. This class involves research and creating a preliminary proposal to present to a thesis committee. A thesis advisor will coach each student. Once the proposal is approved, the student may explore a range of media in the creation of a visual narrative work. Emphasis is placed upon conceptualization, communication, technique and production. This course cumulates in the curating and/or publishing as an advanced visual narrative work. 
Pre-requisites: VIS722 Drawing Strategies for Visual Narrative, VIS741 Character Development, VIS742 Advanced Illustration Techniques